search
Kerala | Kerala Education

‘If someone is going down the wrong road, he doesn’t need motivation to speed him up. What he needs is education to turn him around’. From the very early stages of human life the idea of passing on information to the coming generations in order to help them live better has been in existence. It was only gradually, with the structured settlement into different societies that education as a mass media was formed. All religions speak of the teachings of those who established the belief thereby marking the distinction between the teacher and the taught. If there has been one system that persevered through the aeons of man’s existence on this planet, it can be the one of education. In the ancient Indian Gurukula system education was restricted to the fortunate few. This was so all over the world. From that we have today come to the stage where education for all is considered as a fundamental right in most countries. Even then there are vast sections of the world population who are still denied this. Like food, shelter and cloth, education must also reach everyone in the world. Innumerable are the world organizations that work for it - yet much more remains to be done. The world has become one unit as far as education is concerned. Classes are no longer restricted to the class rooms. Instead it is ‘anywhere’ and ‘any time’. As we speak of the Global Village, we can also speak of the Global Classroom. The principle goal of education today is to create people who are capable of doing new things. The technology involved in the field of acquisition of knowledge has led to education being classified as a commodity or service under the general Agreement on Trade and Tariff (GATT) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). UNESCO has contributed much to the modern trend in education by strengthening higher education as common good at the global level by promoting pluralism and diversity, equitable access and sharing of knowledge. The world has come to realize that the educational system has to be about sustainable development, economic solidarity and environmental protection along with individual development. As Nelson Mandela has remarked, ‘Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world’.
Education in India Today
Since we achieved independence in 1947, our national leaders attached importance to education. There has been steady effort to spread education to all levels of Indian society. At the time of our Independence, majority of the children were deprived of the benefits of primary education. Since then, India has made good progress in the field of primary education. To strengthen the Indian Education System, an educational policy was adopted by the Indian Parliament in 1968. Education was made an important and integral part of the national development efforts. Education occurs in many forms for many purposes through many institutions. Examples include early childhood education, kindergarten through to 12th grade, two and four year colleges or universities, graduate and professional education, adult education and job training. Therefore, education policy can directly affect the education people engage in at all ages. The actual quantity of schooling that children experienced and the quality of teaching they received were extremely insufficient in government schools. A common feature in all government schools was the poor quality of education, with weak infrastructure and inadequate pedagogic attention. This prompted the governments at the Centre and the different states to revamp the system so that high quality education is available to all children . Statistics point to the fact that a large percentage of children in age group 6-11 years have been enrolled in school. At some places, the enrollment rate is 90 percent. However, it is proving very difficult to bring the remaining into the ambit of universal primary education is because of reasons such as people living in inaccessible areas, lack of parent’s interest in sending their children to school, a deep-rooted prejudice against educating girls in some parts of the country.
Secondary Education System
Secondary education is the fulcrum of a nation’s education system. With regard to the pattern of secondary education experiments have been going on since Independence. The 10+2+3 system of education which was recommended by Kothari Commission of 1965 is now being implemented in almost all the States and Union Territories of India. This system provides for two streams - the higher secondary schools; the academic streams paving the way for higher education and the vocational stream of terminal nature. However, very few schools have been able to offer this terminal education. As a result, schools with academic streams still abound, thereby defeating the very purpose of reducing the acute competition for college education. So India needs to revamp the primary and secondary education also to connect better with the high class quality that will be available in the higher educational sphere. The first priority should be given to quality and relevance of the curriculum taught here. Absenteeism, drop out and lack of qualified teachers have to be remedied. There should be better levels of co-ordination between the levels of teaching and the availability of teaching aids and materials. The learning levels of the individual student must be monitored. There should be consistency between the skills taught in the primary and secondary levels and the requirements of the institutions for higher education. There should also be consistency between these skills and the needs of the economy. The acquisition of knowledge is no longer an end in itself; it has to lead the individual to a successful career. This fundamental change in the educational perspective has moved the seats of learning from the exclusive domain of the government. With liberalization in almost every aspect of life, education has also shown a definite tendency to be more a private enterprise. This has naturally led to competition and thus the educational field has undergone a qualitative change. Along with this has come the phenomenon of removing education from the cloistered class rooms and making it available to anyone, anywhere at any time. The principle goal of education is to create men and women who are capable of doing new things. It is a natural phenomenon with the job market becoming global in structure.The needs of the government, the public sector and the private sector have to be continuously evaluated and changes in curriculum should be ensured well in advance to meet the special requirements at the right time. The government should play a strong and significant role in setting educational standards and regulations, improving and monitoring the quality of academic programmes, and coordinating the whole spectrum of education which includes innumerable players at various levels. India runs the third largest higher educational system. If India is to be among the group of developed countries, it must provide access to higher education and technological skill for at least 20% of the relevant age group by the year 2020. The tremendous increase in the number of students and of educational institutions has given rise to the term ‘education explosion’. No doubt, this has resulted in serious problems such as inadequacy of financial resources and infrastructure and dilution of personal attention to the education and character-formation of the students. Also, there is the unwanted side-effect of enormous increase in the number of educated unemployed. However, we cannot overlook the advantages of education explosion in India. Mere increase in the percentage of literate people does not indicate a qualitative change in the educational standards of the people and a real improvement in manpower resources of India. Unemployment problem in India cannot be blamed on the availability of large masses educational people in India. But even now the country is able to provide the third greatest pool of skilled man power. The mainstays of the public universities are the arts, science and commerce courses. There is also a decline in enrolment in pure sciences and a rise in management courses. But the Government has many schemes to attract students to the pure science courses by offering scholarships and many incentives in employment. In the Southern and Western states of India, many minority groups set up private colleges to accommodate students who already had the tradition of English medium education at the secondary level and who could financially afford the professional education but failed to get admission in the public universities on the basis of merit and open competition. The public institutions are at a disadvantage as they are unable to cater to the short term market needs in terms of courses of study like the private institutions. There are more than 17000 colleges, 40 Central Universities under the Ministry of Human Resources Development and 5 that are not under the Ministry, 329 State Universities, 207 Private Universities and a number of Deemed Universities under the University Grants commission. There are also 73 Institutions of National Importance. Apart from these are the many private institutions that provide courses leading to Certificates, Diplomas, Degrees and Post graduate Degrees. There are a host of famous institutes like the chain of Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT), the Indian Institute of Management (IIM), the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), and its School of social Sciences, the National Law University and the All India Institute of Medical Sciences. The unique system of Ayurveda and Sanskrit education which are unavailable anywhere else also makes India a favored destination of students interested in these.
Privatization of Educational Institutions
The Liberalization, Privatization and Globalization policy of the 90s gave an impetus for large scale private participation in the area of higher education. The scope for investment in private education is growing as there are a large percentage of people under the age of 30 and a burgeoning middle class that is ready to invest for quality higher education. According to the survey conducted by FICCI and Ernest and young, 91% of the Engineering Schools, 95% of Pharmacy, 64% in Business Management and 50% of medical schools in India are non- governmental. Higher education worldwide and its future direction are neither simple nor straightforward topics. In higher education, where we are so often bound by the constraints of national thinking, a comparative perspective is especially valuable because academic institutions worldwide stem from common traditions, and the issues facing higher education around the world have many common characteristics. India has more than 31000 institutes which make it the largest provider of higher education. This has resulted in universities from countries like the USA, Canada, New Zealand and Singapore collaborating with the private sector in education in India. The largest in this sector is in the Engineering section followed by Hotel Management. The Indian universities also attract large numbers of students from outside the country. The affordability, lower cost of living and the large English speaking population attract more students here. The Indian diaspora also prefer to have their children educated in India as it is cost effective and keep the children in touch with the tradition and culture of their motherland. Thousands of students join the private institutions as they either fail to get into the very few governmental institutes or are unable to get the subject of their choice. The Government of India has decided to allow foreign universities to set up campuses in India. Experts in the field also believe that it would be beneficial for the country if a strategy to partner with prestigious universities abroad is developed to pursue collaboration for faculty development and research enhancement. In the years to come India is sure to develop into a trusted international educational destination. Partnership between Indian and foreign universities will help attract and retain high quality staff. Studying in these institutions will ensure the students of receiving internationally recognized credentials. Collaboration between the universities and the industry will ensure consistency between research and the needs of the economy. Various international scholarships are available for students who come to India. They are available in various streams from the graduate level to the doctoral level. Most of these scholarships are given to those brilliant students who may have had to give up their studies and research due to financial constraints. There are also many fellowships available for those who are interested in research. Some fellowships are also meant to promote cultural interaction among students from different countries.
Student is the Master
Every individual matters. Every individual has a role to play. Every individual makes a difference. There is an ever increasing demand for higher levels of knowledge and technical skill. The availability of such training was much below demand under the old system. Hence more institutions have to be equipped to meet the growing demand of the students for specific choices. Through innovation and experiments many private institutions have been catering to their demand. The strength of this system lies in its diversity - providing quality education for the elite, vocational training for the job seeker and a general education for those who may not have the merit or the means. In Asian countries like Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Taipei, Indonesia and the Philippines, private institutions have been in the fore front in the educational field for a long time. They cater to more than 80% of the students. The trend is spreading to China, Vietnam and Cambodia, with China boasting of more than 1200 such institutions. The Chinese government supports these institutions by merging, dismantling and changing them to suit the national need. The change is visible in Russia also. Malaysia has more than 700 private colleges and universities and four foreign university campuses. The government there has plans to attract more students to these institutions from all over the world and convert Malaysia into an educational hub. In the Middle East, Saudi Arabia has two private universities and 36 colleges. The system of education has become so vast, diverse and ever - changing those individuals and institutions with the requisite ability and vision have to put in their effort to provide education for all. Hence there has been a rapid growth in institutes of higher education in the private sector. In Latin America, apart from the old universities set up by the Catholic Church, new, profit-making educational institutions are coming up. Argentina has given provisional permission for a few private educational institutions. In Canada public institutions are looking for links with private organizations. As a result of this we see the traditional public institutions struggling for funds while the private, profit-making institutions are getting huge funding from the market. This trend is not likely to change. The success of the private educational institutions offering specialized training in management, technology, education etc. depends on the high quality of training and the world wide acceptance of the degrees they bestow. Many global firms enter into contracts with universities to be ensured of quality man power for their technological and other requirements. Their aim also includes the distribution of their knowledge-based products. Science Parks established on a public-private partnership basis have been giving a good boost to research activities. Many emerging high tech firms in China and other ASEAN countries have been making use of the services of such Science Parks in Singapore, Japan and Taipei. India has shown remarkable innovation in the field of education. Breaking the traditional concept of education for a select few elite, the government has gone all out to make basic education mandatory and higher education available to all those who aspire for it. This has made India the third largest in higher educational system in the world and also the third largest pool of skilled manpower. But even this is not enough to accommodate a large percentage of India’s youth. The Government, with the able support of the private sector has to provide much more in increasing the availability of educational infrastructure here.
Knowledge on Demand
“Every individual matters. Every individual has a role to play. Every individual makes a difference” - Jane Goodall. There is an ever increasing demand for higher levels of knowledge and technical skill. The availability of such training was much below demand under the old system. Hence more institutions have to be equipped to meet the growing demand of the students for specific choices. Through innovation and experiments many private institutions have been catering to their demand. The strength of this system lies in its diversity - providing quality education for the elite, vocational training for the job seeker and a general education for those who may not have the merit or the means. In Asian countries like Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Taipei, Indonesia and the Philippines, private institutions have been in the fore front in the educational field for a long time. They cater to more than 80% of the students. The trend is spreading to China, Vietnam and Cambodia, with China boasting of more than 1200 such institutions. The Chinese government supports these institutions by merging, dismantling and changing them to suit the national need. The change is visible in Russia also. Malaysia has more than 700 private colleges and universities and four foreign university campuses. The government there has plans to attract more students to these institutions from all over the world and convert Malaysia into an educational hub. In the Middle East, Saudi Arabia has two private universities and 36 colleges.
Non-formal Education
Since, education is important for the growth of developing nation like India, various steps have been devised to cut the percentage of dropouts. Non-formal education to offer educational facilities for the drop-outs and to fulfill the desire for additional education in the grown-up-drop-outs is being given a new orientation to make it purposeful and to attract a broad spectrum of the drop-out population. In Indian Education system, adult education programmes covers the age group 1-35 and has been vigorously implemented by the government with the cooperation of many voluntary agencies. Even then much has to be done to realize the target which is 100% coverage adults. India is the process of initiating and developing a system of lifelong learning, which encompasses learning from early childhood through retirement and includes formal learning, non-formal learning and informal learning. In the lifelong learning model, people are motivated to learn on a continuing basis, are equipped with the skills to engage in self-directed learning, given access to opportunities for learning throughout their lives, and offered financial and cultural incentives to participate in lifelong learning. Innovative learning methods like the programmes for study online must also be encouraged. With a strong base in technology already available India can lead in the field of online, virtual and distance education. There are many public, private profit making and non-profit making institutions run by individuals, minorities, religious groups, and corporate bodies that cater to this mode of education. They can cater to the demand of the moment with less expenditure and no constraints on infrastructure, time and space that hamper the regular institutions. The Indira Gandhi National Open University is the chief player in this field serving the educational aspirations of over 3 million students in India and other countries through 21 schools of Studies and a network of 67 regional centers, around 2667 learner support centers and 29 overseas partner institutions.
Higher Education in Kerala
The state can boast of a glorious legacy in education even in the 14th and 15th centuries there were centers of higher learning in Kerala which, apart from the common subjects of study, offered courses in Vedic studies, astronomy and mathematics. Today Kerala has the distinction of being the most literate state in the country. It was also the first state to fulfill the constitutional mandate of providing universal, free, primary education to all the children up to the age of fourteen years. In 1991 Kerala became the first state to be declared as 100 per cent literate. In the field of High School education Kerala is ahead of all other states. Kerala provides free school education to all. There is near universal enrolment and the drop out level is low. More than 94% or the rural population has a primary school within a distance of one kilometer. 98% of the population is served by a school within the distance of two kilometers. A similar percentage of the population gets the benefit of an upper primary school within a distance of three kilometers. More than 98% of the population has secondary schools within a distance of 8 kilometers. The education scene in Kerala has always been dominated by private agencies. But today there is an increase in unaided schools and self-financing courses and institutions in the higher education and technical education sectors. Job oriented courses like nursing, medical, engineering and management are mostly run by the self-financing sector. Schools and colleges in Kerala are run by the government, private trusts as well as individuals. Schools are affiliated to the Kerala State Education Board, Central Board of Secondary Education, Indian Certificate of Secondary Education and the National Institute of Open Schooling. There are 3 Central Universities, 13 State Universities and 2 Deemed Universities in Kerala. Under the three bodies a large number of Arts and Science Colleges as well as Professional Colleges have been functioning well. The higher education in Kerala received a significant incentive with the clearance for the self-financing institutions which led to full - fledged private participation in the sector, till then, the private participation had been through private aided colleges which received public funds but were managed by private establishments mostly of the nature of voluntary or charitable trusts. There is a new trend of ‘non-formal’ educational institutions. They are run on a purely commercial basis and offer job-oriented courses. They are not affiliated to any University or government. Though there is no reliable estimate of such institutions and of the number of students who are enrolled in them, it can be clearly understood that their numbers are not small. The Arts and science colleges now also offer job-oriented courses. They are offered by the existing aided private colleges as well as the newly established self-financing colleges. The Higher education in Kerala is controlled by three bodies - the Department of Collegiate Education, The Kerala State Higher Education Council and the Co-operative Academy of Professional Education.
The Department of Collegiate Education: The main aim of the Department of Collegiate Education is to provide the best quality higher education to the eligible students of the State who complete their Higher Secondary level education. For this various graduate and post graduate level courses in various subjects are conducted in the colleges under the Department.
The Kerala State Higher Education Council: The Council consists of three bodies namely, Advisory Council, Governing Council and Executive council. The 33 member Advisory Council is a body consisting of the Chief Minister, Minister for Education, Minister for Health and Family Welfare, Minister for Law, Minister for Agriculture, representatives of the members of the Parliament from the State, members of the State legislature, members of three tier Panchayats, members of Municipalities, members of Corporations and eminent personalities from different walks of life. The Advisory Council will be responsible for giving guidance to the Council and to evaluate and suggest corrective measures to ensure the proper functioning of the Council. The Governing Council is a high power body chaired by the Minister for Education is responsible for taking final decision on all policy matters on behalf of the Council while the Executive Council chaired by the Vice-Chairman of the Council is responsible for the day to day functioning of the Council. The Council’s main responsibilities are to render advice to the Government, Universities and other institutions of higher education in the State, to coordinate the roles of the Government, Universities and apex regulatory agencies in higher education within the State to evolve new concepts and programmes in higher education and to provide common facilities in higher education.
Co-operative Academy of Professional Education: The establishment of our first institution was in the year 1999-2000 followed by five Engineering colleges and a Medical college in 2000-2001. The first institution started was College of Engineering, Vadakara(Formerly Co-operative Institute of Technology Vadakara), the others were College of Engineering, Perumon, College of Engineering, Trikaripur, College of Engineering, Thalassery, College of Engineering, Kidangoor, Cochin Medical College(Formerly Co-operative Medical College Kochi). The College of Engineering & Management Punnapra was started during the academic year 2008 at Punnapra in Alleppey district. The College of Engineering, Muttathara being started during the academic year 2016 in Thiruvananthapuram district. All the Engineering colleges are affiliated to A.P.J. Abdul KalamTechnological University.
Make the Right Choice
‘Stand up, be bold, be strong. Take the whole responsibility on your own shoulders, and know that you are the creator of your own destiny. All the strength and succor you want is within yourself. Therefore make your own future’. This advice given by Swami Vivekananda to the youngsters must be the guide in making the right choice of your life in education. Here are some of the coveted courses and the canters that are available to help students achieve their aim.


kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.
kerala-kerala kerala-hotels in in-tourism in kerala-cheap hotels-tour packages-munnar-tour packages-honeymoon packages-travel packageskerala kerala-tourism travel-accommodation.